Friday

Greensleeves (Traditional English Folk Song)


"Greensleeves" Facts:
  • Traditional English folk song & tune.
  • A ballad by this name was registered in 1580 as "A New Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves".
  • There is a belief that Greensleeves may have been composed by Henry VIII (pictured) for his future queen consort Anne Boleyn.
  • Anne's rejection of Henry's attempts to seduce her are referred to in the song, "cast me off discourteously."
  • However, as the work is probably an Elizabethan-Italian based style of composition, it is very unlikely that Henry VIII made any contribution to the song.
  • It has been suggested that Lady Green Sleeves was a promiscuous young woman, perhaps a prostitute.
  • The tune Greensleeves is mentioned in Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, (written ~1602).

Greensleeves:

Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously.
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.

Chorus:
Greensleeves was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves was my heart of gold,
And who but my lady greensleeves.

Your vows you've broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.

chorus

I have been ready at your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.

chorus

If you intend thus to disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.

chorus

My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.

chorus

Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.

chorus

Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.

chorus

Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me.

chorus


"Greensleeves"




Posted by ALCHEssMIST.
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I Loved a Lass (Poem by George Wither)


"I Loved a Lass" Information:
  • This is a famous love poem.
  • It is a poem about a forsaken lover.
  • Written by English poet and satirist George Wither (1588-1667).
  • The poem seems to parallel with "Greensleeves", a traditional English folk song & tune.
  • The term "sack", in the poem, is a wine, similar to sherry.

I Loved a Lass:

I Loved a lass, a fair one,
As fair as e'er was seen;
She was indeed a rare one,
Another Sheba Queen:
But, fool as then I was,
I thought she loved me too:
But now, alas! she's left me,
Falero, lero, loo!

Her hair like gold did glister,
Each eye was like a star,
She did surpass her sister,
Which pass'd all others far;
She would me 'honey' call,
She'd--O she'd kiss me too!
But now, alas! she's left me,
Falero, lero, loo!

In summer time to Medley
My love and I would go;
The boatmen there stood read'ly
My love and me to row.
For cream there would we call,
For cakes and for prunes too;
But now, alas! she's left me,
Falero, lero, loo!

Her cheeks were like the cherry,
Her skin was white as snow;
When she was blithe and merry
She angel-like did show;
Her waist exceeding small,
The fives did fit her shoe:
But now, alas! she's left me,
Falero, lero, loo!

In summer time or winter
She had her heart's desire;
I still did scorn to stint her
From sugar, sack, or fire;
The world went round about,
No cares we ever knew:
But now, alas! she's left me,
Falero, lero, loo!

To maidens' vows and swearing
Henceforth no credit give;
You may give them the hearing,
But never them believe;
They are as false as fair,
Unconstant, frail, untrue:
For mine, alas! hath left me,
Falero, lero, loo!

by George Wither


"I Loved a Lass" by George Wither




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Slaughter (Spelling Mnemonic)


A simple spelling mnemonic.

Slaughter is LAUGHTER with an "S" at the beginning.


Image (oppossite) in Public Domain:
Medieval Pig Slaughter
From
The Medieval Cookbook (scan by Peter Isotalo)

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