Wednesday

Unrhymable English Words

General Facts:
  • Many polysyllabic words have no rhyme.
  • Only small group of single-syllable words do not rhyme.
Unrhymable Words:
  • Angst
  • Breadth
  • Depth
  • Gulf
  • Mulcts
  • Ninth
  • Twelfth
  • Wolf
Bearly rhymable words include:
  • Month - Hunth (an abbreviation for hundred thousand)
  • Orange - Gorringe (Sussex surname) & Blorenge (Welsh mountain) & Sporange (more common father is sporangium).
  • Purple - Curple (hind quarters of a horse) & Hirple (walk with a limp).
  • Silver - Chilver (provincial term meaning a ewe-lamb or ewe mutton) & Dicky Dilver.

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20 Sided Dice Regular Icosahedron Shape



A nice example of a regular icosahedron used as a 20-sided dice.
[Image by slayer23 (cc)]

Related Links:
Magical Seven Dice (6-Sided Die)


Tags:

20-Sided - Dice - Icosahedron


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Magical Seven Dice (6-Sided Die)

Dice are usually small cubic polyhedral objects which can be used for generating random numbers (or sometimes other symbols). Dice can be used as gambling devices (i.e. for craps) or for the numerous non-gambling tabletop games.

Two examples of traditional die are given in the image below, showing a cubic shape with rounded corners. Typically the sides are marked with groups of rounded dots (1-6). Opposite sides of a 6-sided die should always add up to seven (7).



The opposite sides of a six sided dice always add up to 7.


Related Links:
20 Sided Dice Regular Icosahedron Shape


Image by jaxpix (cc)

Tags:
7 - Add - Dice - Gambling - Games - Magical - Opposite - Sides


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The Road Not Taken (Poem By Robert Frost)

Important Facts:
  • Written by the American poet Robert Frost (1874-1963) and published in 1916.
  • The poem title is often mistakenly remembered as "The Road Less Traveled".
  • Frost himself warned critics about the poem - "You have to be careful of that one; it's a tricky poem – very tricky."
  • Frost apparently intended the poem to be a gentle jab at his great friend and fellow poet Edward Thomas.
  • Thomas and Frost used to take forest walks and Thomas always would complain after that they should have taken a different path.
  • One interpretation of the poem is that it is an inspirational, to individualism, to non-conformism.
The Road Not Taken (Poem By Robert Frost)

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I marked the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.


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The Unknown Citizen (Poem by W. H. Auden)

Facts About The Poem:
  • The Unknown Citizen is a poem by W. H. Auden.
  • It was published in 1939 in The New Yorker, shortly after W. H. Auden became an American citizen.
  • It was also published in book form (1940), in Auden's collection Another Time.
  • It is the epitaph of a man, identified only by a combination of letters and numbers.
  • The man is described from the point of view of government organizations i.e. the "Bureau of Statistics."
  • The poem satirizes bureaucracy and standardization of people (the average citizen) at the expense of individualism.

The Unknown Citizen (Poem by W. H. Auden)

(To JS/07 M 378 This Marble Monument Is Erected by the State)

He was found by the Bureau of Statistics to be
One against whom there was no official complaint,
And all the reports on his conduct agree
That, in the modern sense of an old-fashioned word, he was a
saint,
For in everything he did he served the Greater Community.
Except for the War till the day he retired
He worked in a factory and never got fired,
But satisfied his employers, Fudge Motors Inc.
Yet he wasn't a scab or odd in his views,
For his Union reports that he paid his dues,
(Our report on his Union shows it was sound)
And our Social Psychology workers found
That he was popular with his mates and liked a drink.
The Press are convinced that he bought a paper every day
And that his reactions to advertisements were normal in every way.
Policies taken out in his name prove that he was fully insured,
And his Health-card shows he was once in a hospital but left it cured.
Both Producers Research and High-Grade Living declare
He was fully sensible to the advantages of the Instalment Plan
And had everything necessary to the Modern Man,
A phonograph, a radio, a car and a frigidaire.
Our researchers into Public Opinion are content
That he held the proper opinions for the time of year;
When there was peace, he was for peace: when there was war, he went.
He was married and added five children to the population,
Which our Eugenist says was the right number for a parent of his
generation.
And our teachers report that he never interfered with their
education.
Was he free? Was he happy? The question is absurd:
Had anything been wrong, we should certainly have heard.


Related Links:
The Unknown Citizen (Poetry Reading)


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Requiescat In Pace (Latin) "R.I.P."


Requiescat In Pace (R.I.P.) Basic Facts:
  • Is a Latin phrase.
  • "Requiescat in pace" is the singular version.
  • "Requiescant in pace" is the plural version.
  • Refers to a short prayer that is typically found on headstones.
  • The words are often abbreviated to "RIP" or "R.I.P."
  • RIP may also be used as an abbreviation for the English words "Rest In Peace".
Requiescat In Pace (R.I.P.) Meaning:
  • "May he (she) rest in peace" (singular).
  • "May they rest in peace" (plural).

Image - R.I.P. Headstone by David H-W (Extrajection) (cc)


Tags:
Latin -
Requiescat in pace - Rest In Peace - RIP - R.I.P.

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