Saturday

Ruby Slippers (The Wizard Of Oz, MGM, 1939)

Ruby Slippers Background:
  • The Ruby Slippers are the magical shoes worn by Dorothy (played by Judy Garland) in the movie The Wizard of Oz (MGM 1939).
  • In the film, Dorothy acquires the slippers after her house falls on and kills the Wicked Witch of the East - allowing freedom for the Munchkins.
  • Dorothy is aware the slippers are magical, but she did not know their specific powers.
  • The Good Witch of the North, at the end of the film, reveals the ruby slippers' secret.
  • If the heels are clicked 3 times whilst repeating the line "There's no place like home", Dorothy can return to Kansas.
Ruby Slippers Historical context:
  • The slippers in the original novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, were silver but MGM wanted to cash in on the value of the Technicolor film process, and so made the shoes iredescent ruby coloured.
  • The video below is from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, where a pair of the ruby slippers has been put on display for the public.



Posted by ALCHEssMIST.
Alchemipedia | Home | Index | AZ | Numbers | Years | Animals | Architecture | Art | Business | Fashion | Films | Food & Drink | Games | Health | History | Literature | Media | Music | People |Politics | Science | Sport | Technology | World |

Pandemic



Definition:

Infectious disease epidemic which has spread across a large area, i.e. continent or worldwide.
World Health Organization (WHO) advises that a pandemic can start when three conditions occur:
  • New disease spreads to a population.
  • The infectious agent infects humans, causing serious illness.
  • The infectious agents spread easily & sustainably among humans.
Derivation:
Comes from the Greek πᾶν pan "all" + δῆμος demos "people".

Organisms known to cause pandemics include:
  • Bubonic plague (i.e. The Black Death)
  • Cholera
  • Influenza
  • Malaria
  • Measles
  • Smallpox
  • Typhus
  • Yellow fever
Potential pandemic infectious risks include:
  • Avian flu (H5N1)
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever
  • Ebola virus
  • Lassa fever
  • Marburg virus
  • Rift Valley fever
  • SARS
Image Credit - modification of image by Quiplash flickr (cc).

Posted by ALCHEssMIST.
Home
| Index | AZ | Numbers | Years | Animals | Architecture | Art | Business | Fashion | Films | Food & Drink | Games | Health | History | Literature | Media | Music | People |Politics | Science | Sport | Technology | World

Aegrotat (Student Illness Medical Certificate)

Aegrostat Key Facts:
  • Aegrotat - pronounced ee'gro-tat, n.
  • From the Latin aegrotat, he or she is sick, 3rd person singular of aegrotare, from aeger, sick
  • This word is the only surviving leftover from the Latin verb aegrotare.
  • The term refers to a medical certificate excusing illness in a student.
  • Mostly used in the context of higher education - ie University Degrees and courses.
  • Aegrotat use is now mostly only seen in Britain and New Zealand.
  • An aegrotat degree is one awarded when a sub-standard performance, or failure to complete all relevant papers, is officially sanctioned on the grounds of student ill-health.

Posted by ALCHEssMIST.
Home
| Index | AZ | Numbers | Years | Animals | Architecture | Art | Business | Fashion | Films | Food & Drink | Games | Health | History | Literature | Media | Music | People |Politics | Science | Sport | Technology | World

Plague Doctor (Medical History)



Plague Doctor:

These people had duties often just limited to visiting victims to ascertain whether they had been afflicted or not with the plague. Because of the serious risks associated with this role they were often very well compensated financially. Many-to-most (depending on region and year) plague doctors were laypersons because trained doctors had often fled from a plague area knowing they were incapable of healing the afflicted and that the risk to them was very high. There are some reports of plague doctors, who whilst tending to a sick patient, died from the plague illness before the patient did.

A description of the clothing worn by a plague doctor is found here.

Famous Plague Doctors:
  • Guy de Chauliac (French surgeon during time of Black Death in Avignon, France).
  • John Paulitious, Edinburgh’s first official plague doctor, died from the plague himself in 1645.
  • Dr George Rae (Edinburgh) replaced John Paulitious on 13 June 1645.
  • Michel de Nostredame (widely known as Nostradamus).
  • "Doktor Schnabel von Rom" ("Doctor Beak from Rome") (1656)
  • Dr John Arderne (14th Century, England)
  • Nathanial Hodges (London, 17th century)
  • Master Giovani de Ventura (city of Pavia in Italy, 1479)

:

Related Links:

The Plague (Bubonic Plague, Yersinia pestis)
Professor Malcolm Casadaban (1949-2009, RIP)
Plague Mask
Plague Doctor (Medical History)
Black Death (Bubonic Plague)
Bubonic Plague Famous Deaths
The Real Mary Kings Close (Edinburgh)

Image credits (flickr) - Top image by jaggitha (cc) & Bottom image by angel (cc).

Posted by ALCHEssMIST.
Alchemipedia | Home | Index | AZ | Numbers | Years | Animals | Architecture | Art | Business | Fashion | Films | Food & Drink | Games | Health | History | Literature | Media | Music | People |Politics | Science | Sport | Technology | World |
 
Web Statistics