Wednesday

Kings Play Chess On Fat Gorillas’ Stomachs (Mnemonic)


Kings Play Chess On Fat Gorillas' Stomachs (KPCOFGS) is another mnemonic for remembering the classification of living organisms. See other Kings Play Chess mnemonics.

Kings - Kingdom
Play - Phylum
Chess - Class
On - Order
Fat - Family
Gorillas' - Genus
Stomachs - Species

Related Links:


Image - Big Fat Gorilla - by azz (cc)


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Because (Spelling Mnemonic)


The following mnemonic is a useful spelling mnemonic for correctly spelling the word BECAUSE.

Use first letter of each word - Big Elephants Can Always Understand Small Elephants:
B - Big
E - Elephants
C - Can
A - Always
U - Understand
S - Small
E - Elephants
Image - I Love You Because ... by Scarlet O. (cc)

Tags:
Because - Big - Elephant - I Love You - Mnemonic - Small - Spelling - Spelling Mnemonic


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United Kingdom Top 50 House Names


1. The Cottage
2. Rose Cottage
3. The Bungalow
4. The Coach House
5. Orchard House
6. The Lodge
7. Woodlands
8. The Old School House
9. Ivy Cottage
10. The Willows
11. The Barn
12. The Old Rectory
13. Hillside
14. Hillcrest
15. The Croft
16. The Old Vicarage
17. Sunnyside
18. Orchard Cottage
19. Yew Tree Cottage
20. The Laurels
21. The Old Post Office
22. The Gables
23. The Hollies
24. The Beeches
25. The Firs
26. Woodside
27. Meadow View
28. The Stables
29. The White House
30. Holly Cottage
31. Willow Cottage
32. Highfield
33. The Haven
34. Springfield
35. Fairview
36. White Cottage
37. Mill House
38 The Orchard
39. Treetops
40. Primrose Cottage
41. The Granary
42. The Nook
43. Corner Cottage
44. School House
45. Greenacres
46. The Old School
47. Honeysuckle Cottage
48. Lilac Cottage
49. Wayside
50. Oaklands

Source - Halifax House Names Survey (2003)

Image - Ginger Bread House by terren in Virginia (cc)


Tags:

Halifax - House - Name - UK - United Kingdom


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Tuesday

Argue and Argument (Spelling Mnemonic)

The following mnemonic is a useful spelling mnemonic for correctly spelling the word ARGUMENT.
Is the correct spelling argument or arguement?

I lost an ‘e’ in the argument.

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Medieval Knights Of The Round Table (Court of King Arthur) List


Medieval Round Table Knights (A-Z):
  • Sir Aglovale
  • Sir Agravaine
  • Sir Anselm
  • King Bagdemagus
  • Sir Bedivere (Bedwyr)
  • Sir Bors
  • Sir Breunor
  • Sir Cador
  • Sir Caradoc
  • Sir Colgrevance
  • Sir Constantine
  • Sir Dagonet
  • Sir Dinadan
  • Sir Ector
  • Sir Ector de Maris
  • Sir Elyan the White
  • Sir Erec
  • Sir Gaheris
  • Sir Galahad
  • Sir Galehaut
  • Sir Galeschin
  • Sir Gareth
  • Sir Gawain
  • Sir Geraint
  • Sir Gingalain
  • Sir Griflet
  • King Hoel
  • Sir Kay
  • Sir Lamorak
  • Sir Lancelot
  • King Leodegrance
  • Sir Lionel
  • Sir Lucan
  • Sir Maleagant
  • Sir Meliant de Lis
  • Sir Mordred
  • Sir Morholt
  • Sir Palamedes the Saracen
  • Sir Pelleas
  • King Pellinore
  • Sir Percival
  • Sir Sagramore le Desirous
  • Sir Safir
  • Sir Segwarides
  • Sir Tor
  • Sir Tristram
  • King Uriens
  • Sir Ywain (Owain)
  • Sir Ywain the Bastard
Image Credit - by Gabe.G (cc)

Tags:
Court - King Arthur - Knight - Medieval - Medieval Knight - Sir - The Round table


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Bishopsgate (London City Gate, Until 1760) History


Bishopsgate General Facts:
  • One of the 7 historic London City Gates through the London defensive wall from Roman times.
  • The old location of the gate is opposite where the NatWest Tower now stands.
  • William Shakespeare lived in the area in the 1590s.
Bishopsgate History:
  • Originally built by the Romans.
  • The gate takes its name from a 7th century Bishop of London, Eorconweald.
  • Eorconweald had the gate rebuilt on the old Roman foundations.
  • The gate was rebuilt by the Hansa merchants in 1471.
  • Hinges were made for the gate by the bishops of London.
  • The final version of the gate was erected in 1735, & later demolished in 1760.
Functions Of Bishopsgate:
  • The gate often displayed the heads of criminals on spikes.
  • Goods were transported through this gate.
Image 1600s - Public Domain - From University of Toronto Wenceslaus Hollar Digital Collection.

Tags:
London - London City Gates - London Wall - Roman - William Shakespeare -


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Monday

Without You (Poem by Lolita Ray)


Without You Background:
  • This short poem is written by Lolita Ray.
  • The poem is translated from Swedish.
  • Lolita Ray is a poet, singer-songwriter & performance artist living in Sweden.
  • Her poems are expressed in a style that requires the reader to think for themselves.

WITHOUT YOU

It's possible to live without you

It's possible to live without all of you

It's possible to live

Without


by
© Lolita Ray

Source:
Lolita Ray, Rhys Jones (2007). The right of a voice. Published by Tregolwyn (Cowbridge, Wales, U.K.)


Image ( I can't smile without you) by Klaire_Lee (cc)

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Wharram Percy (Deserted Medieval Village, DMV) North Yorkshire, England


Wharram Percy Village Geography:
  • Wharram Percy is a deserted medieval village site.
  • Best-preserved of Britain's 3,500 abandoned villages.
  • It is found on the western edge of the chalk Wolds in North Yorkshire, England.
  • The village is currently in the care of English Heritage, who have produced audio tours & historic information panels at the site.
  • The ruined church (St Martin's) is visible above ground.
  • To the East of the village is the Yorkshire Wolds Way long-distance footpath.
  • The site is also signposted from the B1248 Beverley to Malton road.
Wharram Percy Village Historical Facts:
  • Settled since pre-historic times.
  • Village most active from the 10th to 12th centuries.
  • Mentioned briefly in Domesday Book.
  • Wharram Percy is perhaps the best-known deserted medieval village in England.
  • The lady of the manor, a minor noble as at 1321, had been Eustachia Percy, a cousin of Henry Percy. [2]
  • Walter Heslerton, the husband to Eustacia Percy, died of the Black Death in 1349. [2]
  • Following Walter Heslerton's death the whole manor was placed in the hands of trustees as their son was still a minor. [2]
  • Eustacia percy, at the time, was incapable of running the manor herself as she was insane. [2]
  • Eustacia Percy died in 1365, with the landholding passing then to her son Walter Percy, who died in 1367. [2]
  • The manor then became subsumed into the great Percy estate, & fell into further disrepair.
  • The Black Death of 1348–49, probably did not have a significant part in the desertion of Wharram Percy.
  • The villagers appear to have suffered from changes in prices and wages in the 15th century.
  • The village was abandoned shortly after 1500, when the lord of the manor (Baron Hilton) removed the last 4 families, & knocked down their homes to give extra sheep pasturage. [from legal document of 1517]
Wharram Percy Deserted Medieval Village Project (1950-1990):
  • The Village was first identified by the historian Professor Maurice Beresford of the University of Leeds in 1948.
  • The project is one of the longest running (1950-1990) research programmes in England.
  • John Hurst, a Cambridge University graduate of medieval pottery, took over the running of the early excavations.
  • John Hurst also introduced open area excavation to Wharram Percy, which at that time it was a new technique.
Recent Archeological Finds:
  • Skeletons of the women from Wharram Percy have much larger bones than those of contemporaries elsewhere. [1]
  • According to Simon Mays, of English Heritage, "Women at Wharram were much more muscular and bigger boned than their city counterparts. Whilst they were still doing the domestic chores and looking after children, they clearly also mucked in with the hard labour in the fields, building up their arm strength." [1]
  • "The research underlines the way that the sexual division of labour was much less marked in rural areas than in the cities of the time,". [1]
References:
[1] - Skeletons from Wharram Percy ... [Guardian, 2009]

[2] - Benedict Gummer (2009). The Scourging Angel. Publishers The Bodley Head

Top Image © Paul Allison (cc)

Bottom Image by dougbelshaw (cc)

Tags:

Archeology - Baron Hilton - Black Death - English Heritage - Eustachia Percy - Henry Percy - John Hurst - Maurice Beresford - Medieval Deserted Village - Village - Wharram Percy - Wolds -


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Saturday

How Many Seconds Till End Of The Year (Google Search) I'm Feeling Lucky

Google has a neat little way of showing the countdown to the end of the year in seconds.

At the Google search page click on the "I'm Feeling Lucky" button without typing an entry in the search bar. A counter appears near the bottom of the Google search page counting down to the end of the year in seconds. Below is an image of the Google search page showing the instant in time when there were still 460,000 seconds until the end of the year (2009).



Tags:
Countdown - End Of Year - Google - Seconds - Year


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Thursday

Kings Play Chess On Frosted Glass Surfaces (Mnemonic)


Kings Play Chess On Frosted Glass Surfaces (KPCOFGS) is another mnemonic for remembering the classification of living organisms. See other Kings Play Chess mnemonics.

Kings - Kingdom
Play - Phylum
Chess - Class
On - Order
Frosted - Family
Glass - Genus
Surfaces - Species

Related Links:


Image by Dědeček on Flickr (cc)


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Pastourelle (Word Definition) French Medieval Poetry


Pastourelle Definitions:
"a type of poetry concerning the romance of a shepherdess". [Wiktionary]

"A French (or Provençcal) medieval lyric characterized by its pastoral theme, usually the attempted seduction of a shepherdess by a gallant knight. Many examples survive from the troubadour and trouvère repertory of the 12th and 13th centuries." [Answers.com]
Pastourelle Interesting Facts:
  • The pastourelle poetic form contrasts with that of songs of courtly love.
  • In courtly love the object of desire is a noble lady where clear social constraints dictate events.
  • In the pastourelle, a commoner is the object of desire, with less refined associations-outcomes described or implied.
  • The point of view of a pastourelle is that of the man (knight).
Pastourelle Origins & History:
  • From the French.
  • Pastourelle is the French spelling of the Occitan word Pastorella.
  • Typically an Old French lyric form concerning the romance of a shepherdess (pictured).
  • This poetic form originated with the medieval troubadour poets of the 12th century.
  • In particular the form is associated with the poet Marcabru.
  • In the early pastourelles, the poet knight meets a shepherdess who gets the better of him in a wit battle, but also displays general coyness.
  • The poet knight (narrator) usually has sexual relations with the shepherdess, either by consent or rape.
  • Later examples of this poetic form moved toward pastoral poetry by having a shepherd & also sometimes a love quarrel.
  • Pastourelle, as a poetic troubadour form, blended with goliard poetry & was practiced in France & Occitan until the Carmina Burana of c. 1230.
  • The pastourelle, in Spanish literature, influenced the serranilla.
  • By the 15th century pastourelles existed in French, English, Welsh & German.

Image - Painting of a Shepherdess by
William Bouguereau - 'Pastourelle'

Tags:
Courtly Love - French - Knight - Medieval - Occitan - Pastourelle - Poetry - Seduction - Shepherdess - Troubadour - William Bouguereau

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Metacriticism (Word Definition)

Metacriticism Important Points:
  • Criticism of criticism.
  • The examination of the principles, methods, & terms of criticism.
  • This may be general, as in critical theory.
  • Alternatively, it may be more focussed such as the study of critical debates or particular critics.
  • The term generally implies the assessment of the principles associated with critical interpretation & judgement.
Other Definitions:
"A criticism of criticism, the goal of which is to scrutinize systematically the terminology, logic, and structure that undergird critical and theoretical discourse in general or any particular mode of such discourse." [Greig E. Henderson & Christopher Brown, University of Toronto]
"The examination of the principles, methods, and terms of criticism." [Ethnographic Thesaurus]

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Wednesday

Kings Play Chess On Fairly Good Soft Velvet (Mnemonic)


Kings Play Chess On Fairly Good Soft Velvet (KPCOFGS) is another mnemonic for remembering the classification of living organisms. See other Kings Play Chess mnemonics.

Kings - Kingdom
Play - Phylum
Chess - Class
On - Order
Fairly - Family
Good - Genus
Soft - Species
Velvet - Variety

Related Links:

Image - Velvet Fabric

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Paul Wells (Hanged For Forgery, 1749)

Paul Wells' Conviction For Forgery:
  • Paul Wells, a young man, was tried for forgery at the Oxford assizes in 1749.
  • Wells had altered the date on a bond, so that he would not need to pay it till the next year.
  • This case of forgery was technically a capital offence.
  • The judge for the trial was a Mr Justice Willes.
  • In view of the relatively trivial nature of the forgery, Mr Justice Willes had assured Paul Wells that a pardon was very likely when the judgement and recommendation was sent to the King.
  • Unfortunately for Paul Wells, King George II greatly disliked the Prince of Wales who was a good friend of Judge Willes.
  • As a result, King George II rejected the judgement (the pardon recommended by Mr Justice Willes).
  • Paul Wells was hanged at Oxford on September 1, 1749.
Quote About Paul Wells:
Of Paul Wells it was said that, 'Wine, Dainties, and Women he embrac'd with open Arms, and with great Rapidity rush'd on his Ruin' (Anon. 1749: 8-9). [1]

References:
[1] - Anon. (1749) An Authentick Account of the Life of Paul Wells, Gent, Who was Executed at Oxford, Sept. 1. 1749, for Forgery. 2nd ed. London.


Tags:

Forgery - Hanging - King - Oxford - Prince of Wales - Trial

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